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Digital Marketing, Big Data and CX: 3 Key Takeaways from DMX Dublin

Posted By The Marketing Institute, 29 March 2017

Some Marketing Institute guest speakers have a go at cracking today’s big marketing questions

dmx dublin speakers

We’re delighted with the lineup of fantastic speakers from various backgrounds and industries who spoke at our DMX Dublin conference on 8th March. 

Remembering that The Marketing Institute’s purpose is to enable marketers to build great brands and great careers, we decided to pick the brains of some of these thought leaders on the big questions and trends that arise in marketing in Ireland today. Here are their insights.

 

Forget “Digital Marketing”, let’s get back to the basics 

Digital has opened up countless opportunities for marketers, and the pace it’s moving at means we’re constantly on the lookout for the next big thing. Yesterday was all about live video; today we’re talking AI, AR and VR… But are these shiny new tools distracting us from the bigger picture, and the true role of marketing?  

Peter Kim (Lego), notes: “Marketers have taken an approach to digital that has loosened up from what made it so awesome 10-15 years ago.  These days what consumers see is a lot of clutter, irrelevance, and interruption when it comes to advertising in digital.” So how do we go back to the core of marketing?

It’s time to take a step back and look at the brand, the objective, the audience, and how we achieve long-term success. Marketing Consultant Shane O’Leary explains: “We need to be less focused on complexity and get back to what marketing really means: driving sales and business objectives rather than focusing on the tactical minutia. Digital is causing us to focus more on the short term than the long term. We focus more on effectiveness rather than efficiency. We tend to not extrapolate these short term metrics back to how they re driving business.”

Once we are clear on business objectives, then and only then can we look at the tactical options that are available today. Because as Matthew Stockbridge (Mondelez International) stated: “There’s no “new media”, just media. It’s about what’s the right media for a campaign to get messages across, based on what the creative idea and the audience are.”


 

Use Big Data to understand the consumer… but don’t overdo it 

The amount of data available today means that “you can better serve your customers by knowing and then predicting what they want” (Karen Boswell, Adam & Eve DDB).  And that’s great news for marketers, right? 

However there is a dark side to big data. Mark Earls (Herd) notes that “people are beginning to feel uncomfortable about the amount of data that’s available and how it is used”. They are increasingly reluctant to share their personal data. They want to know what way it’s going to be used, and will only share it if we provide enough value in return. As Nicola Millard (BT Global) puts it: “If I share data with you, what am I going to get back? Do you make life easier for me? Do you personalize stuff? Do you remind me of things that I really want to be reminded of?” 

And then there’s the ongoing argument between data and creativity, the fear that algorithms and programmatic are making marketing dull and predictable. Consultant Michelle Goodall illustrates: “We live in a bubble through social media and our search habits. Nobody is delighting me anymore! I’m getting stuff around my age […] but I don’t want that! I want to be surprised and delighted! So how can we continue to surprise and delight people, but also give them what they want?”

The answer could lie in Shane O’Leary’s suggestion that  “it’s not about data OR creativity. The value is in the overlap. Data needs something built on top of it. Creativity needs some data to give us that insight.” 

 

Improving customer experience: AI Vs. Humans 

If there’s one thing all marketers can agree on, it’s the importance of customer experience. “Marketing isn’t just about what you say, it’s about what you do. About every single touchpoint that customers have with your brand. It’s the smallest thing you fail to think about, that is the thing that undermines your product, your brand and your business” (Scott Morrison, Think Sprint). Marketa Mach from IBM iX adds that “it’s a focus on customer experience that’s going to lead to differentiation. CX pays in business performance as it does in customer satisfaction”. 

The question that arises today is: will new technologies such as AI help brands improve CX, or are they deteriorating it by removing human interaction? 

One thing that AI does well is fulfilling the consumer’s increasing need for instant gratification, for example in retails where AI can assist customer service, as highlighted by Karen Boswell.

On the other hand, social media marketer Amanda Webb observes that “being human and trustworthy is what people are looking for now. We’re going back to doing business with the local shopkeeper”. 

Either way, Lisa Wood (Atom Bank) acknowledges that “we need to start thinking now about AI and what it’s going to do to the marketing landscape, because it’s going to be a different skillset and a very different engagement with our customers. AI is changing how we interact with customers”. Matthew Stockbridge adds that it’s still unclear what is a clever or a terrible use of AI, and opinions on specific campaigns are often divided. But he argues that “as long as trends are causing conversations and dividing people, those are the things we need to be aware of”.

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A Day in the Life of... Jane Madden, Head of Strategy at Vizeum

Posted By The Marketing Institute, 29 March 2017
Updated: 27 March 2017

jane madden vizeum

The Marketing Institute: What does a Head of Strategy at Vizeum do?

Jane Madden: My role is to work with the senior teams in Vizeum to craft client business strategy and ensure the brand and brand idea are not lost in media. That means being an independent voice, a good listener and willing to challenge. I listen to what the brief is, and what we know of the task at hand. Much of my time is spent articulating where a brand should sit, how it should be positioned and the impending challenges the business is facing.

 

MII: What were your key career moves to get to your current role?

J.M: The biggest decision was moving from creative to media. Culturally, it was a very big adjustment and a steep learning curve. I was apprehensive of such a shift but now that media is a living platform for brands and consumers to engage, it meant my skills were transferable.

 

MII: What is the biggest challenge you face in your role?

J.M: The biggest challenge I have faced in my role is adjusting to a different culture and getting my head around the world of media and data. I had been a planner in a creative agency for 15 years and I felt I needed to broaden my skills and challenge myself. Moving into media means that I can continue to add value in a changed consumer and creative context.  

 

MII: What key skills do you need to be effective in your role?

J.M: You need to be articulate and passionate. I will never be the person in the room who knows the most about media, but my experience means I can bring brand thinking, and an understanding of brand and communications, to bear on all our clients business. It’s important to be able to communicate that knowledge clearly and in a way that motivates or excites others in the room.

 

MII: Describe a typical working day.

J.M: My job means I can be working on anything from a pitch to a rebranding to understanding the role of media in future proofing a client’s business; so I need to keep a broad perspective. Every morning, after I have gone through my mails I take about twenty minutes to have a quick scan of  ‘the news’. For me, that includes everything; newspapers, Instagram, WARC, Campaign, Adworld etc. The rest of the day is never typical. I can be attending meetings, writing presentations, doing desk research, working on a brand positioning, or pitching for new business.

 

MII: What do you love most about your role?

J.M: The thing I love most about my role is that I am constantly learning. Like all aspects of communications, media is changing. Focusing on how media can become a route to market for our clients and be a tool for growth is exciting.

 

MII: Looking ahead, where might your career path lead to next?

J.M: It’s very hard to say. I am happy in my job and as we at Vizeum continue to evolve and expand our skillset, I think I will continue to be challenged. Vizeum is a progressive agency with big plans and I know I can both add a huge amount to those plans but also learn and develop my skills at the same time too.

 

MII: To whom do you look for professional inspiration in your role?

J.M: I have had great influences in my professional life and there are a number of women I admire within the industry. Karen Hand has always been a great advocate for planners and planning and has been a great mentor to me. I also greatly admire Emer Howard who has been instrumental in putting real creative planning back on the map. 

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A Day in the Life of... Emer McCarthy, Head of Brand at Paddy Power Betfair

Posted By The Marketing Institute, 22 March 2017
Updated: 21 March 2017

Emer McCarthy

The Marketing Institute: What does a Head of Brand at Paddy Power Betfair do?

Emer McCarthy: There’s never a dull day, with two betting brands, each with differentiated brand ideas, distinct visual identities and segmented target markets. Unlike other partner brands, the Paddy Power and Betfair brands must activate around the same sports events, at the same time of year. So clear brand planning is needed to ensure we don’t compete with each other. It keeps me busy.

 

MII: What were your key career moves to get to your current role?

Emer: Ten years in O2 gave me exposure to lots of marketing disciplines. I cut my teeth in retail marketing, the principles of which have never left me. But it was in ATL comms that I found my flow. And not only selling phones or price-plans, but projects like The O2 music venue and the Irish Rugby team sponsorship gave me experience of the music and sports industries. And I think that’s how I found myself working in Betfair. I’ve been very lucky.

 

MII: What is the biggest challenge you face in your role?

Emer: Paddy Power Betfair is only one year into the company merger. Both brands are well established and have competed directly with each other for many years. So right now, my biggest challenge lies internally. We need to ensure that everyone in the company understands both brands – what drives them, where they should be evident, when they should come to life -and when they shouldn’t.

 

MII: What key skills do you need to be effective in your role?

Emer: You obviously need to know your stuff when it comes to brand and advertising. But all that goes out the window if you can’t manage and negotiate with your stakeholders. Being able to not just negotiate, but also listen to stakeholders, ensures you build a level of trust with them.  And that applies to any role I’ve been in over the years.

 

MII: Describe a typical working day.

Emer: No two days are alike. It could swing from creating brand guidelines to briefing campaigns to our agency, Lucky Generals. Every day involves some form of agency management – and I think that’s the most important part of my day. It might only be a short email or a quick call, but ensuring the agency receive great briefs and are afforded every creative opportunity, gives us the best chance of great work. Then there are days, like during the Cheltenham festival, where everyone rolls up the sleeves and does whatever is needed.

 

MII: What do you love most about your role?

Emer: I love advertising. Always have. So having an input into the Paddy Power and Betfair campaigns in the UK, Europe and the US makes it easier to get up in the morning. I also love my football, so it’s not lost on me that I get paid to jump on a plane and meet FC Barcelona in the Camp Nou. It’s not a bad job.

 

MII: Looking ahead, where might your career path lead to next?

Emer: I find the further up the ladder I climb, the further removed from the creative process I become. And being involved in the creative process is where I love to be. My current role has a great balance of both. It’s always good to know what it is that makes you happy and more importantly – what doesn’t. So I’d like to see where we can take the Paddy Power and Betfair brands in the future. And for a brand like Paddy Power, it’s always going to be fun.

 

MII: To whom do you look for professional inspiration in your role?

Emer: Dave Trott, the advertising planner and all ‘round advertising legend is my hero. I often go back to his books when I’m feeling uninspired. Ed Catmull from Pixar tells a great story about how creativity applies to business; I love his book. I’m also lucky to have had brilliant mentors – people like Damian Devaney (Smurfit), Johnny Cahill (Heineken) and Paul Dervan (Indeed) drove me insane – but taught me everything I know.

 

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How Trump Won (a SOSTAC® Analysis)

Posted By PR Smith, 21 March 2017

Many are still wondering how Donald Trump became president of the United States Of America, despite himself? Here’s an analysis by PR Smith, using his SOSTAC® Planning Framework to explore some of Trump’s plan and to give some insights into his subsequent successful campaign. Comments are most welcome. Situation analysis (where are you now) , Objectives (where are you going?), Strategy (how do you get there?), Tactics (the details of strategy), Action (how do you ensure excellent execution) and Control (how do you know you are getting there – what will you measure?). I will use these to categorise various aspect of the Trump campaign but please remember this is just an outline not an in-dept detailed analysis.

 

PR Smith SOSTAC

PR Smith’s SOSTAC® Planning Framework

 

Situation Analysis

 

Customer Analysis

Who – are Trump’s potential voters?

Trump focused on “left-behind” voters, specifically white working-class men (and women). He initially gambled on targeting one powerful voting bloc, (some pollsters thought this would alienate too many people) suggests Harvard’s professor Stephen Greyse (Fottrell 2016).   Clinton’s target audience was far broader, reaching out to the middle-class and “left-out” voters and black and Latino ‘left-out’ voters (many of whom had not yet a slice of the American pie). A month before the elections Trump had 57k transactors (contributors) of whom 68% were male and 32% were female, compared to Clinton who had 914k transactors of whom 36% were male and 64%  were female. Far more variables were eventually used to segment the market into dozens of target segments. In fact, a small English company who had also worked on the Brexit ‘Leave’ campaign for UKIP, worked for Trump and divided the US population into 32 personality types, and focused on just 17 states (see part 3).

Why – do Trump’s potential voters vote (what are their needs)?

Many people wanted change. Many others were frustrated and maybe even angry about their lives. Some have fears rather than hope. Is it possible that Trump’s upbeat’ #MakeAmericaGreatAgain or #MAGA hashtag played into the unconscious fears that if you don’t vote for Trump, America will get worse ie whatever is bad about America will become far worse? See the word-cloud graphics (in the final, ‘Control’ section) which demonstrates how Trump repeated these messages.

What the elite missed was the sources of the anger & resentment that has lead to the populist upheavals in the US & Britain & many other parts of the world (Harvard’s Professor Michael Sandel 2017).

Why were voters angry? What the elite missed was the sources of the anger & resentment that has lead to the populist upheavals in the US & Britain & many other parts of the world. (They) assumed it’s anger against immigration and trade and at the heart of that is jobs. But it’s also about even bigger things., about the loss of community, disempowerment, & social esteem (a sense that the work that ordinary people do is no longer honoured & recognised (& rewarded).’ Sandel 2017)

How – do Trump’s potential voters decide (how do they process information)?

Shorter attention spans. Research from Harvard revealed that attention spans for the first ever telivised political debate between JFK and Nixon back in 1960, was only 42 seconds (the maximum time to get a serious political message across). This fell to just 5 seconds in 2008 and even less since in 2012. There are many other variables involved here also, but, short attention spans is significant and perhaps gives a clue why Britain voted marginally for Brexit (short anti-EU messages had far more impact than long economic pro EU messages). .

Major Market Trend – A Gap In The Market

We live in a post truth-era. ‘Dishonesty in politics is nothing new; but the manner in which some politicians now lie, and the havoc they may wreak by doing so, are worrying’ says the  Economist magazine (2016). The worrying phrase ‘post-truth’ was even named Word Of The Year by Oxford Dictionaries (Flood 2016). Defined by the dictionary as an adjective “relating to or denoting circumstances in which objective facts are less influential in shaping public opinion than appeals to emotion and personal belief”. The spike in usage, it said, is “in the context of the EU referendum in the United Kingdom and the presidential election in the United States”.

This is compounded by the moral vacuum which opens the gates for extremist politicians. Here is Harvard Professor Michael Sandel’s chilling observation: “… in the face of pluralism  and for the sake of toleration … to insist on a non-judgemental, value-free politics .. that creates a moral vacuum , a void, that will invariably will be filled  by narrow, intolerant moralisms.” Sandel (2017)

 

Competitor Analysis

During the Republican nomination race, Trump saw a right wing gap and went for it. He also analysed the political establishment through the eyes of disenchanted voters. Trump became the Republican candidate for the presidential election. Next he analysed his opposition, the Democrats, Hilary Clinton. When he found a perceived weakness that resonated with his voters (see the Control section in part 2) he went for it. President Obama had unprecedented success in targeting, organizing and motivating voters,we imagine Trump’s team studied this blog post How Obama Became America’s First Black President to understand his competitor’s strategy and tactics.

 

This image went viral during the 2008 campaign with the caption: ‘This seat is taken’

 

Current Performance

With the election just a month away, donations raised by October 2016: Clinton had $298m from 914,000 transactors (donors) and Trump had just $50.1m from 57,000 donors (Cortana et al).

Opinion polls favoured Clinton.

 

 

 

Objectives

 

Originally to win the Republican Nomination and then, win the presidential election (after that we just don’t know).

 

 

Strategy

Old Strategy

Trump initially raised his own profile by making headline-grabbing statements, often by calling in to television shows, supplemented by a rally once or twice a week to provide the appearance of a traditional campaign (Bertoni 2016).

New Strategy

Trump’s crystal clear positioning as the ‘controversial (non-establishment) ordinary guy’  was supported by data driven highly targeted tailored messages on facebook & twitter to “left-behind”  white working-class men (and women), combined with sentiment manipulation, machine learning, constant beta culture and almost instant reactions to audience mood swings

Trump’s son in law, Jared Kushner, took over the campaign created this new strategy and, amongst other things,  set up a secret data operation-like a Silicon Valley startup. ‘Kushner eventually tipped the states that swung the election. And he did so in manner that will change the way future elections will be won and lost.’ (Bertoni 2016).

Positioning

Trump positioned himself as a non-establishment guy. An ‘outsider’  a ‘non-political establishment guy’.   He simultaneously positioned Clinton as an establishment person. An ‘insider’ (a politician linked to Obama’s policies) (Kanski 2016). Trump played the confrontational card which helped him to establish authenticity amongst frustrated voters. So he became a ‘controversial (non-establishment) ordinary guy’.

Meanwhile, Trump positioned Clinton as an untrustworthy ‘insider’ and threatened to take her to court after the election. Clinton’s authenticity was challenged by high-lighting the fact that ‘she seemed to say one thing in her speeches and another behind the scenes, illustrated in her emails leaked by Wikileaks and “basket of deplorables” comments (Kanski 2016). The CIA revelations days before the vote appeared to attack Clinton’s authenticity. Or was all this information fed by the Russians? There’s definitely a movie in this story. 

‘controversial (non-establishment) ordinary guy’    v     untrustworthy ‘insider’ establishment lady

 

Was it like this?

 

 

trump clinton positioning

a possible perceptual map

 

Apart from Clinton’s followers, one wonders whether the average American could relate to Clinton as easily as they could to Trump (or Obama in the previous two elections).

The ‘Ordinary (non-establishment) Guy’ Created Authenticity

While Trump followers believed Trump had authenticity as he, rightly or wrongly, ‘says it like it is’.  The difference in authenticity, according to Kanski, was simply that ‘People can relate to bankruptcies, to locker room talk, to tough talk on terrorism, and that was difference. Whilst Trump might be a billionaire, but he’s been bankrupt, uses locker-room talk i.e. his life experiences somehow seemed to resonate more with the average undecided voter.’  

 

Targeting

Trump stayed focused on the “left-behind” voters, specifically white working-class men (and women). As mentioned earlier, this was deemed risky (targeting one powerful voting bloc).  Clinton’s target audience, on the other hand, was far broader, reaching out to the middle-class and black and Latino ‘left-out’ voters (many of whom had not yet a slice of the American pie). Trump’s relentless use of data continually sharpened his targeting of those battleground states (the ‘swing states’, that over recent elections have gone both ways). They are the key to winning the election. In recent elections Florida and Ohio (3rd and 7th largest states, with 29 and 18 electoral votes respectively) have been swinging back and forth between the parties.

Data-driven Decision Making

Within three weeks, in a nondescript building outside San Antonio, Kushner had built what would become a 100-person data hub designed to make more informed decisions which leveraged the magic marketing formula (see part 2):

  • messages (topics of speeches)
  •  targeting
  • travelling / rally locations
  • fundraising

 

Kushner built a custom geo-location tool that plotted the location density of about 20 voter types over a live Google Maps interface

Trump combined his crystal clear ‘non-establishment’ positioning, data-driven targeting, with agile use of  used the Magic Marketing Formula to win. His subsequent tactics which were driven by the over-riding strategy. Part 2 explores the second half of SOSTAC® – Tactics (including the Magic Marketing Formula), Action and Control.

 
This article was originally published on  PRSmith.org.
 
 
See How Trump Won (part 2) – using The Magic Marketing Formula – a SOSTAC® Analysis and later  – How Big data was used to win the election (part 3).

SOSTAC® is a registered trade mark of PR Smith. For more information on SOSTAC® Planning & becoming a SOSTAC® Certified Planner visit www.SOSTAC.org .

Learn SOSTAC® with PR Smith:

At PR Smith’s next SOSTAC® Master Class in the Marketing Institute:

23-24th March - Learn more

5-6th October -  email ailish@mii.ie to register your interest

 

Or as part the Marketing Institute’s Executive Diploma in Strategic Digital Marketing:

Starting 10th April – Learn more

 

See also: 

 

SOSTAC® Certified Planner Portal   

SOSTAC® Guide to Your Perfect Digital Marketing Plan 


ABOUT THE AUTHOR

PR Smith trains and advises a range of blue chips as well as smaller innovative businesses through bodies such as the Marketing Institute of Ireland and the UK Government's Growth Accelerator Programme. Paul’s eMarketing eXcellence book is a recommended text and his new SOSTAC® Guide To Your Perfect Digital Marketing Plan is very popular. His four other books are translated into seven languages. Paul's SOSTAC® Marketing Planning System is used by organisations around the world and has prompted Paul to set up SOSTAC® Registered Consultants and Learning Centres. Paul's NFP social media driven edutainment programme, The Great Sportsmanship Programme, is designed to inspire a new generation of global citizens through true two minute stories.

www.PRSmith.org

www.GreatSportsmanship.org

Facebook: PRSmithMarketing

Twitter: @PR_Smith

 

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A Day in the Life of... Kyla O'Kelly, Board Director at Javelin

Posted By The Marketing Institute, 15 March 2017
Updated: 14 March 2017

Kyla O'Kelly Javelin

The Marketing Institute: What does a Board Director at Javelin do? 

Kyla O’Kelly: My role is a very varied one.  Javelin is a wholly Irish-owned,  full service, Creative and Media Agency delivering strategy and planning, advertising, digital and data-led marketing creative and media solutions for some of Ireland’s busiest brands. I directly lead some key accounts and work closely with our strategic planners and client teams to ensure we are delivering the best solutions to the business challenges our clients face. I love innovation and learning and try as much as possible to get involved with our client’s NPD and really relish trying to find new ways of meeting tough commercial and brand goals. I manage the direct and data led marketing side of our business here also.  Finally as a Board member I’m part of the team defining the direction we want the agency to take and ensuring we have the best talent possible to get us there.

 

MII: What were your key career moves to get to your current role? 

Kyla: I did a 12 week internship in Javelin as part of a Marketing Diploma straight after a degree in Trinity. I then moved to Brussels and started my professional career with a traineeship programme in the Communications area of the European Commission, followed by working in a public affairs lobbying event organisation. It was a junior Communications officer role, and the company I was with grew rapidly in the time I was there - it was a brilliant few years of learning in a fast moving environment and I was lucky to be allowed lots of freedom and responsibility. At the same time in Dublin, Javelin was also growing, and they offered me an interesting role to move back, working with a really inspirational boss..she however decided to go and travel after a short time and I gradually moved into her role and then onto the Javelin board a couple of years later. 

 

MII: What is the biggest challenge you face in your role?

Kyla: It changes regularly. Today, ensuring we place an adequate value on the work we do for our clients and as a result get remunerated for the collective thinking that goes into defining and then delivering the right strategy and work. The second is around finding and keeping the right people - the smart, passionate & interesting ones are in finite supply.   

 

MII: What key skills do you need to be effective in your role?

Kyla: Experience is really important at this point in this role understanding what’s possible in  any major project or campaign challenge and how to aim to avoid any pitfalls from the outset. An open mind. Diplomacy and negotiating when required and always having a clear point of view on any issue at hand. Personally being able to admit I’m wrong and correct the course to someone else’s more informed better view is an important attribute. People management and (receiving and giving) mentoring are also really important.    

 

MII: Describe a typical working day.

Kyla: A typical working day is a combination of Javelin and home life intersecting (with 2 kids it’s inevitable that it does). There’s the usual tap dancing in the mornings to get them out to school and then on to meetings or my desk – I like the mornings and now there’s a hint of sunshine creeping in that helps too. In Javelin we have work in progress meetings twice a week typically that traffic our work and creative time – we are structured but not so rigid that plans don’t change through the week so those meeting are important. We have clients here in Ireland and globally – so client meetings are done in lots of different ways - face to face of course but increasingly also video calls help shortcut constant email ping pong as campaigns progress. I love writing as part of my role, whether initial approaches to campaign thoughts, or campaign overviews or submissions so will often disappear into a room at the agency, as we work open plan in an old stone warehouse in Smithfield and the debating can get heated. Listening to new ideas, and seeing great work makes me smile and there’s nothing better than presenting something you both like creatively  and believe strategically will have a great impact and thankfully that’s regularly part of my day at the office. I have gone back to school recently and am doing the Marketing Institute's Exec Diploma in Digital Strategy at night so that takes up part of my week now. I’m also on the Board of a Charity, “Dress for Success Dublin”, we work to help women that need our support most to get in to the workforce with Career guidance and mentoring/HR help, CV development and interview prep and techniques and we also then suit them for their interview and beyond, so in a given week I could have a board meeting there too.         

MII: What do you love most about your role?

Kyla: I like the fact that this world is a mix of commerce, art and science. Our ambition is to deliver ideas, work, that can change our clients’ business so there is a major commercial side of the role and I love seeing the impact our work can have. The art is of course the incredible creative craft. And then science - I have always been a huge user of data – pre and post campaign and can spend hours digging through reports and research for usable bits in our thinking or to set off a new direction.  

 

MII: Looking ahead, where might your career path lead to next?

Kyla: To continue and grow in senior management at Board level. This year Javelin is 30 and I’ll be working on a project where we will mentor and give our talented output to 3 Irish start-ups to give something back of our collective experience in here through the year - so that’s all kicking off now and is exciting and new. I will keep working in the NFP sector giving as much time as I can there too.   

 

MII: To whom do you look for professional inspiration in your role?

Kyla: There are many specific names of people that have helped me grow in my role, but more usefully; anyone that has an ability to look laterally at a problem and have an open and generous mind to solve it creatively. The clients and colleagues who get and respect the work we do and guide, praise or critique fairly and where possible politely. Anyone who has an ability to pick themselves up following a fall, whether professional or personal  and start again. Any full time working mum holding all the bits together.  

 

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