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Evolving digital media behaviour across Ireland

Posted By Kantar Media, Wednesday 24 October 2018
Updated: Tuesday 23 October 2018

digital media behaviour across Ireland

When it comes to today’s consumer digitally accessing information about key topics of interest, long gone are the days of standard websites being the default and largely only option. Whilst of course websites remain very popular, adults in Ireland today are turning in large numbers to a plethora of other sources in order to get information about what they are most interested in.

From news, to sports, to travel, to jobs, internet users are exploiting everything from blogs, to podcasts, to RSS feeds and online video. The challenge for today’s marketer is to understand amidst such digital fragmentation, which mix of digital sources is most popular with their own target consumers.

If we take a look at that most perennially addictive of topics - the news - latest findings from Kantar Media’s TGI consumer data in the Republic of Ireland reveal that when it comes to sourcing information on news/editorial content, 38% of internet-using adults claim to turn to websites, 11% use mobile apps and 8% exploit email or text alerts, with the same proportion looking at Twitter feeds. Clearly websites are still the most popular option for news by some distance, but as adoption of new tech continues to evolve, the landscape may change considerably in the years to come.

Indeed, whilst websites remain the preferred means of accessing information about a range of topics, beyond websites there are some significant fluctuations in adoption of digital sources, depending on what it is people are seeking information about.

For example, when it comes to arts and entertainment, after websites, the most popular news source is online video and audio streams, leveraged by 8% of internet using adults. Conversely, when it comes to home and garden as an area of interest, video and audio streams finds itself fifth on the list of digital sources, behind the likes of mobile apps, blogs and email/text alerts.

If your suspicion is that age plays its part in which digital sources are most popular, you would be correct. If we go back to news, the TGI consumer data reveals that 35-44 year olds are 20% more likely than the average internet user to access websites for their news. On the other hand, 15-24 year olds are 41% more likely to access online video/audio streams and 21% more likely to leverage podcasts for their news. Indeed, an examination of how younger adults access areas of interest digitally may represent a key pointer to the future evolution of use of digital information sources.


About Kantar Media

Kantar Media provides the most comprehensive and accurate intelligence on media consumption, performance and value. We delivery best in class data and services to help our clients drive communications strategies efficiently and effectively. Through consumer intelligence data, media monitoring, evaluation and insight, we can assist you in all aspects of your communications planning and evaluation.

www.kantarmedia.com/ie

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5 Tea Trends to Look for in 2019

Posted By Mintel, Wednesday 17 October 2018
Updated: Tuesday 16 October 2018

Consumers are developing a growing interest in more innovative tea and are no longer satisfied with a bland cup of milky English Breakfast. Always on the hunt for unique and authentic experiences, they are looking for unexpected flavours and functional benefits. Using Mintel Global New Products Database (GNPD), we have selected five products that encapsulate tea trends to watch out for in 2019.

 

1. Bold flavoursrum and honey tea mintel trends

Green Hills Rum and Honey Flavoured Herbal Tea – Poland: Indulgent flavoured teas have the potential to fill a gap for those consumers who are looking to move away from sugary beverages – or even alcohol! As consumers around the world increasingly adopt healthier lifestyles, they can still get the feeling of indulging in a drink with this rum and honey flavoured rooibos tea. It’s free from alcohol, but enriched with a warm mix of cinnamon, apple, liquorice and star anise.

 

vegetable infusion mintel tea trends

 

 

2. The veggie revolution

Pompadour Veggie Mix Infusión de Verduras Relax – Spain: Rising demand for plant-based foods and interest in vegetarian and vegan diets has opened opportunities for vegetables to appear in new, unexpected categories. While it’s not new for infusions to feature vegetables in their ingredient lists, we’re now seeing more brands marketing veggies prominently on pack. This product combines tomato, rosehip, apple, onion, basil, cinnamon, and passionflower.

 

relax mintel tea trends

 

3. Time to relax

Fabindia Organics Organic India Certified Organic Tulsi Honey Chamomile Tea – India: Chamomile is the most common botanical ingredient in teas and is known for its relaxing properties, but there’s scope for other calming ingredients to emerge. For instance, holy basil, also known as tulsi, has been part of traditional Indian Ayurvedic medicine for decades and has a long history of being stress-relieving. For holy basil to compete with chamomile, however, brands need to start educating consumers on its benefits. Other adaptogens to consider as ‘relaxing’ ingredients include ashwaganda, brahmi, and ginseng.

 

 

power tea mintel trends4. Power tea

Lipton Daily Boost Green Tea with Ginger, Lemon Verbena and Turmeric – Germany: Supercharged teas, combining naturally functional ingredients with added nutrients, push functional tea to the next level. Indeed, traditional tea brands increasingly look to diversify their functional offerings, promoting a holistic lifestyle that supports general wellbeing as well as more specific health benefits. Launched in Germany, this product is a flavoured green tea with added vitamin C and superfoods like yellow turmeric, aromatic lemon verbena, and a touch of spicy ginger.

 

healthy gut tea mintel trends5. Healthy gut

Cofco Chinatea Pro Tea – Malaysia: Probiotics and prebiotics have become quite the buzzwords: globally, launches of probiotic food and drinks rose 11% over the 12 months to July 2018, compared with a 1% growth a year ago, according to GNPD. Pro Tea is dark, fermented, and undergoes microbial fermentation, while later being pressed into bricks or cakes for ageing. While some probiotics can be unstable in extreme temperatures, the strain in Pro Tea can withstand hot temperatures when brewed with boiling water. It’s said to promote regularity, reduce blood lipids, improve digestion and help with weight management. Tea is usually not associated with fermentation or probiotic content and less than 1% of tea launched in the past year to June 2018 contained probiotics.

 


 About Mintel

Mintel is the world's leading market intelligence agency. For over 40 years, Mintel's expert analysis of the highest quality data and market research has directly impacted on client success. With offices in London, Chicago, Belfast, Düsseldorf, Kuala Lumpur, Mumbai, Munich, New York, São Paulo, Seoul, Shanghai, Singapore, Sydney, Tokyo, and Toronto, Mintel has forged a unique reputation as a world-renowned business brand.

For more information on Mintel, please visit www.mintel.com. Follow Mintel on Twitter: www.twitter.com/mintelnews or join the Mintel LinkedIn community: www.linkedin.com/company/mintel.

mintel logo

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8 Key Findings from the 2018 Salary, Market Insights & Sentiment Survey

Posted By The Marketing Institute and Alternatives Ireland, Wednesday 17 October 2018
Updated: Tuesday 16 October 2018

marketing salary survey 2018

Women earning less and missing out on benefits; gig economy thriving, engagement levels diving and Brexit casts a shadow  

The 2018 Alternatives & Marketing Institute of Ireland Salary, Market Insights & Sentiment Survey is just out, which provides a unique insight into Ireland’s Marketing industry. Now in its fifth year and with almost 1,200 respondents from the marketing, digital and customer community, it takes an in-depth look at differences by company sector, size, career level, gender and other factors including Brexit and Marketing spend.



The 8 Key Survey Findings:



1. Overall, respondents were well remunerated ranging from support level at an average of €30,000 base salary to Directors at an average of €123,000. Directors average salary €123k; Head of: €95k; Managers; €68k, Practitioner level: €49k; Support level: €30k

In addition, 61% of respondents were awarded salary increases in the last year, 41% 1-5% increase.


2. On the gender front, male respondents in general are better paid, receive more non-salary benefits, feel more secure and are more engaged. Reflecting a similar result to last year, the survey finds that male respondents are paid more for the same roles than their female counterparts at almost all levels from practitioner level upwards. The pay differential increases the more senior the career stage. Eg a male director will get €15,000 more than a female director (+13%). A number of male respondents are less well paid at early career stage however.


3. Males get more benefits than women across almost all benefit categories in particular in areas such as bonuses, contributory pensions, healthcare, share options and cars. The exception is flexible working, which is also considered more motivating for women than men.


4. Market sentiment continues to be positive, but Brexit is looming and many sectors are anticipating its potential negative impact, in particular the government, logistics, pharma, motor and drinks sectors. 1 in 5 are still uncertain of how it will affect them.


5. The gig economy is alive and kicking in marketing. As the business that pioneered Flexible working in the marketing industry in Ireland since 2000, we’re pleased to report that its popularity has never dimmed. In the battle for talent, companies are increasingly accessing flexible resource as a way to attract or retain in-demand talent. 80% of companies access flexible resources (interim managers, contractors, consultants) and one in three respondents have contracted or freelanced before.


6. Resources are relatively tight with the majority of companies having marketing teams of 10 or less and budgets of €1m or less. Larger companies, multinationals and consumer facing businesses have greater resources.


7. Asked how Marketing and its role within an organisation is viewed, 64% of respondents said it was perceived as a strategic, revenue generating partner. 42% said it was perceived as strategic and crucially is also represented on the board. It’s also worth noting that 22% perceived it as a support function only unchanged from last year.  In light of Brexit in particular, the marketing profession has never had a more crucial role to play in developing the economy, building new revenue streams and opening new markets. The strategic, customer oriented, value adding role it plays is critical.


8. Engagement is a big issue, at all levels (despite more people being secure in their roles), but particularly at more junior levels and amongst females. Despite security in their roles, salary increases and a positive outlook for their business in general, respondents are less engaged in their roles today and 61% expect to move on in the next two years. Although this is across the board, this is particularly marked for those at earlier career stages and for females.



The survey will be made available to download on 19th October.

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Data Protection: The New Millennium Bug?

Posted By The Marketing Institute, Thursday 11 October 2018

On Wednesday 10th October, we hosted a panel discussion in Dublin Institute of Technology to look at GDPR’s impact so far, who is benefiting from it, how it is being implemented and why it should still be on marketers’ list of priorities. The panel featured:

  • Robert Dunne, barrister specialising in data protection and employment law
  • Carl Kane, Data Management Tech Lead at Bank of Ireland
  • Evelyn Wolf, Co-founder & Marketing Strategist at BusinessBrew
  • Barry Hand, Growth Lead at Pointy and lecturer in Analytics

 

Robert Dunne opened the evening by reminding us all of how we felt in the lead up to 25th May. A big change was coming! Speaking on 20th May, Data Protection Commissioner Helen Dixon described the GDPR as “terrifying and exciting”. Although it’s fair to say that the marketing community felt a little more terrified than excited at the prospect of it.

And now? The sky hasn’t fallen. The apocalypse hasn’t come. And GDPR feels a bit like yesterday’s overhyped news. But is it really?

 

Where are we now?

While we are busy moving on, a lot is happening in the background that we should pay attention to. The just-announced 2019 budget is quadrupling the DPC’s budget for 2019 to €15.2 million. The DPC’s office have hired 45 new staff to date and will grow to a total of 180 staff by 2019. So make no mistake here: there WILL be stricter enforcement.

While there were 2,600 complaints made to the DPC in 2017, there are already 1,700 since June 2018. The hype around the GDPR has created more awareness, and in turn more complaints. Another change brought by the GDPR is that the fines are no longer decided by a judge (or in the district court). It is now the DPC that decides how much a company will be fined. And as EU law is now standardized, the levels of fines in Ireland have to be equal to those in other EU countries.

 

Who’s at risk?

There is a common misconception that big data companies such as Facebook and Google will be the DPC’s main targets. Robert Dunne highlighted an example that proves otherwise: a funeral planning company in the UK that was recently fined £90,000. Would your company be able to take such a hit? Evelyn Wolf acknowledged that a lot of businesses have been “in hiding”: they assume that the DPC will go after the big guys first, and in the meantime, they are adopting a “wait and see” approach. But what they do not realise it that it only takes one complaint to put an organisation in trouble. So safer to get on top of things now instead of letting our organisations’ issues grow bigger and bigger.

 

Who’s benefiting?

There is a point to be made for cleaning databases indeed. Removing old and probably incorrect data from inactive customers is simply good housekeeping. It can save organisations time and money in the long run as we stop wasting our resources going after customers who have moved on. GDPR is also a win for individuals as it forces companies to respect their data and to stop doing lousy marketing. Carl Kane adds that GDPR is also a win for bigger organisations, as it has allowed them to gather data from numerous business units into one integrated master database. And as they have large number of customers, they can afford to clear their data and still be left with lots of “clean” data.

Unfortunately, this doesn’t always work in the way it was intended, notes Barry Hand. The term Barry uses to describe how many organisations are implementing GDPR compliance is “horrendously”. Are consumers really benefiting from the constant popping up of endless consent forms, privacy notices and tick boxes? Does anyone really read those? A reason for those implementation issues is that the GDPR can be quite unclear. Professionals need a clear list of what it is exactly that they need to do. Instead, everyone is basing decisions on their own interpretation of the text.

 

What’s next?

Finally, let’s not forget about the e-privacy regulation coming our way in 2019, an update of the current e-privacy law from 2011 which regulates direct marketing. And we will need to be ready for this too.

 

Executive Diploma in Data Protection for Marketers

To answer those many questions and help marketers create a clear GDPR compliance plan for their organisation, we have partnered with DIT to bring you the Executive Diploma in Data Protection for Marketers. Running every Wednesday evening for 8 weeks, the course led by Robert Dunne will equip you with the knowledge and skills to become fully compliant.

Learn more about the course.

 

 

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EX and CX - how we are doing in Ireland

Posted By Clare Kavanagh, W5, Wednesday 10 October 2018

EX and CX Ireland

W5 is a specialist customer experience consultancy - everything we do is about designing and delivering great CX. We know employees are at the heart of this endeavor as without engaged and motivated workers, Irish industry will never succeed in delivering strong customer experiences.  Nevertheless, Irish workers views on customer experience are largely unrecorded so in 2018, W5 undertook our third national survey to fill this gap in understanding.

 

Employees feel the CX offered could be better - We asked employees, how they would rate the experience that customers receive from the organisation for which they work? The good news is that more workers strongly agree that the CX provided by their organisation is very good (Forty one percent gave a 9-10 score on a ten-point scale) than is poor (Twenty one percent gave a 1-6 score on the same scale). We know that employees tend to be most critical so this likely bodes well for the actually rating of customers. However, if one of our clients at W5 received this score I think we would be strongly saying there is room for improvement here.

 

 So how can we do better?  - What do we need to do to use CX to win and retain target customers against competitors and drive profitable growth. At W5 we identified some time ago, the key competencies that differentiate organisations that we know of and work with that are successful at CX

 

Leadership: Successful organisations have senior management championing customer service and bringing the customer voice to all decision making.

 

Resourcing Customer experience: Successful organisations put resources behind the CX agenda - it’s not just lip service.

 

Coherence between brand and CX: In successful organisations there is coherence between brand promises made and CX delivered on the ground

 

Customer understanding is strong and most importantly is acted upon

 

And finally, and most importantly employees are engaged in the customer experience agenda.

 

Unfortunately, our survey makes for some gloomy reading re: Irish workers views of their employers’ performances across each of these competencies.   

 

What is our advice based on Irish employees’ feedback?

 

  • It’s not good enough to just have a senior management team leader named for CX, board room decisions need to reflect the influence of the customer. The argument that CX is good for profits needs to be had and evidenced.
  • Employees need to be shown that the senior management team are backing CX with resources.  Resources need to be made available to deliver on identified CX initiatives.
  • It’s very important that the CX delivered demonstrates the brand values on the ground and is as compelling and distinctive as the brand concerned. Be clear about brand values when talking to employees about CX.
  • In the GDPR environment you need to make sure customer feedback is acted upon and each interaction with customers is worth the investment for your organization and the customer.
  • Engage and engage some more with employees in the CX agenda. Arguably this should be the first step as it’s the most important factor and Irish employees currently do not believe this is being done.
  • Intermediate or middle managers especially need a lot more support, engagement and dialogue. Our research showed that these managers who through their day to day coaching and supervising of customer facing staff are such an important lever for CX are no more engaged in the CX agenda than others.

 

Finally, based on our experience we would urge every business in Ireland who has a real ambition to use CX as a strategy to win and retain target customers and drive profitable growth to undertake their own survey of employees. In this way you can diagnose your strengths and weaknesses across the key competencies, take the learnings and action.

 

Note: The findings shared in this article were captured using an online poll, interviewing a nationally representative sample of 1,000 workers over a 5-day period in September 2018. The same approach we have used for this research over the past 3 years 

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

Clare Kavanagh, CCXP, is Managing Director of specialist customer experience consultancy, W5 

Clare.kavanagh@W5.ie

 

Clare Kavanagh, shared the results of this survey at a recent CXPA event in Dublin.

CXPA (Customer Experience Professionals Association) Ireland is the Irish chapter of the global CXPA organisation that comes together to promote and develop Customer Experience best practice.  As a rapidly growing organisation we are keen to welcome new members and anyone with an interest in CX to become involved. Please contact the CXPA here at cxpaireland@gmail.com to join.  

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